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Taking Delivery of Your Repaired Motorcycle

Motorcycle Accident Claim in California

California Motorcycle Law


Under California law, when you pick up your motorcycle, it should be the same condition as it was before your motorcycle accident. We recommend that the motorcyclist thoroughly inspect and ride his motorcycle to determine whether there are any defects or continued problems with the motorcycle. Sometimes, there is frame or faring damage that will provide a high-speed wobble, which may not be discovered under the rider is going over 60 or 70 miles per hour. Other times, we have found out that the transmission or gears are not working through the full course and will require major engine work. As such, before any motorcycle is accepted, a thorough inspection must be conducted. If for any reason you find that the motorcycle is not in the same condition, it is important that you return it to the motorcycle repair location for a re-inspection with the property damage adjuster.

You also have the right to have your motorcycle inspected by a professional motorcycle appraiser at your expense, to evaluate and document the condition of your motorcycle following repairs. Such an objective evaluation may be worth the expense (estimated $300) if you find yourself in a dispute with your own insurance company and the body shop over the quality of the motorcycle repairs.

Do not wait one, two, or three months before you make a request for a re-inspection. They will then allege that there was some subsequent accident or damage to the bike that was the cause of the problem. As such, it is important that you timely and promptly advise your property damage adjuster of any problems with the motorcycle. You have a duty to inform the insurance company of any problem as soon as you find out. They will allege normal wear and tear of some pre-existing condition or other subsequent accident that may substantially reduce your possibility of a claim for a re-inspection and supplemental property damage claim.




by

Tom Reinecke

California Motorcycle Lawyer