Norman Reedus Give Novice Riders Some Tips

On “The Walking Dead,” Norman Reedus’s character, Daryl Dixon, is often seen riding a motorcycle in the zombie apocalypse, a skill the actor honed for decades. Reedus is so into motorcycles that AMC gave him his own unscripted series, “Ride With Norman Reedus.”

But it’s far from a “Sons of Anarchy” meets Daryl Dixon examination of Harleys and bad boys. In the show, Reedus takes rides through various parts of the country, exploring different facets of the motorcycle culture. In the premiere episode alone, he cruises up the Pacific Coast Highway, from Los Angeles to Santa Cruz, stopping at a factory that makes electric motorcycles, and tapes a podcast with the people behind “Motorcycles & Misfits.”

Reedus says the show is for novices and experts alike. “[The goal] is to have people feel like they’re on that ride with us,” he says. “We didn’t want to be a gearhead show in anyway.”

Below, Reedus shares his tips for those newbies curious about how to start riding.

Talk to people, the old-fashioned way

Reedus says the best place to start with motorcyles is to seek out a friend who rides. “Talk to them about it,” he says. “Have them show you things. Sometimes it seems like a daunting thing to learn. But it’s kind of a natural progression from bicycle to a Vespa to a motorcycle. You just have to learn gears and certain things that involve a motor.”

Don’t go big

Reedus understands that getting on a motorcycle for the first few times can induce some anxiety. Therefore, he suggests sticking to something more manageable — and there’s no shame in it.

“You can start small,” he says. “Little motorcycles are just as fun. You just have to get over that hurdle. I can see how it can be pretty intimidating. Sometimes I get on bikes and I get intimidated.”

Norman Reedus riding with Imogen, Liza, and the Re-Cycle Garage crew, California, February 2-4, 2016
Norman Reedus riding with Imogen, Liza, and the Re-Cycle Garage crew, California, February 2-4, 2016 PHOTO:MARK SCHAFER/AMC

Surroundings matter

Beginners should focus on their immediate surroundings, Reedus says. Having access to much more in your line of sight makes the experience much different than driving a car. “You don’t have the restrictions of being in a car and seeing just what’s out the windshield and having blind spots,” he says. “You really don’t have blind spots on a motorcycle.”

That said, being hyperaware of cars around you is key. “You just have to be very aware of what’s going on around you,” he says. “Nowadays you have to assume everyone around you is texting and driving, since everyone does it.”

Get in your head

Reedus uses his time on a bike to work through the things in his day-to-day life. And it can become a zen-like process. “I do some of my best thinking with the helmet on,” he says. “That’s how I go to work every day. I think about my lines on the way to work, I decompress on the way home, I come up with ideas like that all the time. Although you’re connected to what’s around you, you’re also very isolated. The conversation is with yourself, in your head.”

Think outside the box for those first rides

“Away from traffic is the best place to ride bikes,” he says. “I discovered so many great trails and great routes throughout the U.S. based on what people told me; it was all word of mouth. Those were all my favorite rides, when you get off the beaten path. Go to the emptiest, most scenic routes. I say, take the slow route.”

Source: Wall Street Journal

Check out some of our riding tips found in our previous blogs. Our tips are truly to help save you from having a motorcycle accident or crash. If you or a loved one are involved in a motorcycle crash contact The Reinecke Law Firm at (800)275-8326 for a free case evaluation. We have helped thousands of motorcyclists with their cases over the past 30 years and have the knowledge to help you with your motorcycle crash. Do not hesitate to call, we are available 24/7.