Motorcycle Crash in Taft, CA

June 10th Crash

The California Highway Patrol says a woman who was driving a white pickup made a left turn directly into the path of a motorcycle, causing an accident that left the motorcyclist with major injuries Thursday afternoon.

The accident occurredon June 10th, just after 3 p.m. on Highway 119 at Ash Street in Taft, CA.

CHP Officer Jeremy Lace said the pickup was heading Northbound on Highway 119 making a left turn to go west of Ash Street when the crash occurred. Continue reading “Motorcycle Crash in Taft, CA”

Norman Reedus Give Novice Riders Some Tips

On “The Walking Dead,” Norman Reedus’s character, Daryl Dixon, is often seen riding a motorcycle in the zombie apocalypse, a skill the actor honed for decades. Reedus is so into motorcycles that AMC gave him his own unscripted series, “Ride With Norman Reedus.”

But it’s far from a “Sons of Anarchy” meets Daryl Dixon examination of Harleys and bad boys. In the show, Reedus takes rides through various parts of the country, exploring different facets of the motorcycle culture. In the premiere episode alone, he cruises up the Pacific Coast Highway, from Los Angeles to Santa Cruz, stopping at a factory that makes electric motorcycles, and tapes a podcast with the people behind “Motorcycles & Misfits.”

Reedus says the show is for novices and experts alike. “[The goal] is to have people feel like they’re on that ride with us,” he says. “We didn’t want to be a gearhead show in anyway.”

Below, Reedus shares his tips for those newbies curious about how to start riding.

Talk to people, the old-fashioned way

Reedus says the best place to start with motorcyles is to seek out a friend who rides. “Talk to them about it,” he says. “Have them show you things. Sometimes it seems like a daunting thing to learn. But it’s kind of a natural progression from bicycle to a Vespa to a motorcycle. You just have to learn gears and certain things that involve a motor.”

Don’t go big

Reedus understands that getting on a motorcycle for the first few times can induce some anxiety. Therefore, he suggests sticking to something more manageable — and there’s no shame in it.

“You can start small,” he says. “Little motorcycles are just as fun. You just have to get over that hurdle. I can see how it can be pretty intimidating. Sometimes I get on bikes and I get intimidated.”

Norman Reedus riding with Imogen, Liza, and the Re-Cycle Garage crew, California, February 2-4, 2016
Norman Reedus riding with Imogen, Liza, and the Re-Cycle Garage crew, California, February 2-4, 2016 PHOTO:MARK SCHAFER/AMC

Surroundings matter

Beginners should focus on their immediate surroundings, Reedus says. Having access to much more in your line of sight makes the experience much different than driving a car. “You don’t have the restrictions of being in a car and seeing just what’s out the windshield and having blind spots,” he says. “You really don’t have blind spots on a motorcycle.”

That said, being hyperaware of cars around you is key. “You just have to be very aware of what’s going on around you,” he says. “Nowadays you have to assume everyone around you is texting and driving, since everyone does it.”

Get in your head

Reedus uses his time on a bike to work through the things in his day-to-day life. And it can become a zen-like process. “I do some of my best thinking with the helmet on,” he says. “That’s how I go to work every day. I think about my lines on the way to work, I decompress on the way home, I come up with ideas like that all the time. Although you’re connected to what’s around you, you’re also very isolated. The conversation is with yourself, in your head.”

Think outside the box for those first rides

“Away from traffic is the best place to ride bikes,” he says. “I discovered so many great trails and great routes throughout the U.S. based on what people told me; it was all word of mouth. Those were all my favorite rides, when you get off the beaten path. Go to the emptiest, most scenic routes. I say, take the slow route.”

Source: Wall Street Journal

Check out some of our riding tips found in our previous blogs. Our tips are truly to help save you from having a motorcycle accident or crash. If you or a loved one are involved in a motorcycle crash contact The Reinecke Law Firm at (800)275-8326 for a free case evaluation. We have helped thousands of motorcyclists with their cases over the past 30 years and have the knowledge to help you with your motorcycle crash. Do not hesitate to call, we are available 24/7.

Do you own a Honda Goldwing?

If you are an owner of a Honda Goldwing you may need to get your airbag replaced.

Over the past year there have been millions of Takata airbags recalled for safety reasons. The main concern is the bag projecting metal pieces like a grenade when the airbag goes off. While this has only effected cars just this week it is now effecting motorcycles.

The Honda Goldwing is the primary concern as it is the only motorcycle that has an airbag. Models of the Goldwing that are affected by the recall range from 2006 to 2010 and only in certain regions. Continue reading “Do you own a Honda Goldwing?”

Memorial Day Weekend Southern California Crashes

May 27th

Riverside

Deputy Philip Borja, 25, of Upland, died at Riverside Community Hospital after the collision, which involved two motorcycles and two cars, according to the Corona Police Department. A 24-year-old man was released from the medical center after being treated for his injuries.

The crash happened shortly before 4:30 p.m. as the two motorcyclists were heading eastbound on Hidden Valley Parkway, just east of the 15 Freeway, police said in a news release.

A Volkswagen Beetle and a motorcycle both erupted in flames after a fatal collision in Corona on May 27, 2016.A 57-year-old woman, driving a white Ford Fusion, exited a Stater Brothers parking lot and turned left onto the street. The car “entered into the path of travel of the two motorcycles” and was struck on the driver’s side by Borja, the statement said. The other rider avoided the Fusion by swerving into oncoming lanes.

Both cycles struck a Volkswagen Beetle, driven by a 22-year-old woman, traveling westbound on Hidden Valley, according to investigators. Both Borja’s motorcycle and the Beetle then erupted in flames. Neither of the two drivers was injured.

As of Saturday morning, no arrests had been made nor any citations issued in connection with the incident.

Anyone with information about the collision was asked to contact Traffic Investigator Clark Eveland by phone at 951-817-5764 or email at clark.eveland@discovercorona.com.

May 28th

A motorcycle was fleeing from the California Highway Patrol and crashed in Hillcrest this morning, officials and witnesses said.

CHP officials say an officer tried to stop a motorcycle traveling at a high-rate of speed along southbound SR-163 near Friars Road at 8:26 a.m.

Images: Hillcrest Motorcycle Crash The motorcycle failed to stop and exited the freeway at University Avenue.

Witnesses said when the motorcycle hit a dip in the road at 6th and Robinson it crashed.

CHP officers said the rider crashed into a parked car. Debris was strewn along 6th Avenue between University and Robinson. The stretch of road was closed to traffic.

A silver car was parked near a curb and appeared to have half of the motorcycle wedged underneath its front bumper. One person was transported to Scripps Mercy according to CHP officials.

Source: NBC News San Diego

May 29th

San Bernardino

San Bernardino- SR-138  on Sunday at 1:50 PM

A 26 year old man was riding his motorcycle southbound state route 138, about 5 miles east of the I-15, when he skidded into oncoming traffic hitting a SUV hauling a boat Sunday afternoon.

Paramedics pronounced the biker dead due to fatal head injuries, he was wearing a helmet. The bikers name has been released,
Joshua Ryan Persons from Huntington Beach.

There is no further information given at this time.

Huntington Beach

Sunday, May 29. 1:30 PM

A 72 year old man was pronounce dead at the scene, when police arrived first responders where giving CPR for about half hour. 2011 BMW crossed into the westbound lane and hit head on with a Jeep containing two women ages 52 and 53 from walnut and the other covina. Both have been transported to Huntington Memorial Hospital with moderate injuries. No more further information available.

May 30th

Los Angeles

A motorcyclist and his passenger were killed early Monday morning in a single-vehicle crash in South Los Angeles. The motorcyclist was identified as the Whittier resident Edgar Inda, 29, according to Investigator Selena Barros of the coroner’s office.

The crash happened just after midnight on Washington Boulevard east of Santa Fe Avenue, said Officer S. Hui of the Los Angeles Police Department’s Central Traffic Division.

Inda was driving the motorcycle eastbound on Washington Boulevard past Santa Fe Avenue when he lost control at a curve and struck the center divider. “He was probably speeding,” Hui said. Both Inda and his passenger were ejected and neither were wearing a helmet.

Inda was pronounced dead at the scene and the woman was taken to a hospital where she was pronounced dead.

 

We send our deepest condolences to the families and friends that were involved and affected by these motorcycle crashes. We wish and hope that those that are still with us may make quick recoveries and encourage all motorcyclists to continue to ride safely. The Reinecke Law Firm is a huge supporter of the motorcycle community and has been for the last 30 years. If you or a loved one were involved in a motorcycle accident we encourage you to seek medical help and then call to call The Reinecke Law Firm at (800)275-8326 for a free case evaluation. You may be entitled to compensation for your injuries, damaged property, loss income, and more. We Ride, We Fight, We Win.

Recent Motorcycle Accidents May 20th

Riverside Motorcycle Accident- May 20th

Accident #1

A minivan made a U-turn in front of an oncoming motorcycle, killing the rider and tying up a major street during the evening commute through the Mission Grove area of Riverside, police say.

The 36-year-old motorcyclist from Moreno Valley died at the scene. The wreck happened at 3:53pm Friday, May 20, along the eastbound lanes of Alessandro Boulevard at Vista Grande Drive.

He was riding a 2015 Suzuki GSXR 750 heading east when a westbound 2008 Honda Odyssey driven by a 42-year-old Riverside woman turned left to begin a U-turn in front of him, Sgt. Dan Reeves said in a written statement. The names have not been given for confidential reasons.

The woman and two children that were in the minivan were unhurt, said Detective Greg Matthews. If you or anyone have any additional information please call Matthews at 951-826-8724.

Accident #2

Location: In the area of the 91 fwy just before Madison Street going toward downtown Riverside.

Approx 8:15 pm today, a rider went down on black and white sports bike. Medics were on the scene. Possibly 3 cars involved in the incident & biker appeared to be getting transported to the hospital.

Ventura

Location: I405 N / Ventura Blvd, West Valley – May 20 2016 6:05PM

In the evening a silver Honda CRV hit a red motorcycle. There may have been another car involved, but no description was given. The vehicles blocked the slow lane before they were moved over to the shoulder.

Los Angeles

May 22nd, In West LA Around at 12:15am Sunday Morning on the transition road of the southbound 405 and westbound 105, it was reported that a Motorcycle was down in the center divider, but the rider wasn’t visible. Fire Department and CHP responded. No further info is available at this time.

Norwalk

Location: I-605 WB & Imperial (Norwalk)

A motorcyclist was killed in a crash in Norwalk that shut down part of Imperial Highway Sunday night, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department said.

Deputies were investigating the fatal crash at 6 p.m. just west of Curtis and King Road.

Investigators couldn’t say what led to the wreck that left the motorcyclist, only described as a 38-year-old man, dead. It wasn’t clear how long the partial closure would be in effect, but it was still closed at 9:30 p.m.

The Reinecke Law Firm sends our condolences to the families and friends that were involved in these motorcycle accidents and we hope that those that are still with us will make a quick and full recovery.

If you or a loved one are ever involved in a motorcycle accident please seek emergency medical attention and then contact The Reinecke Law Firm at (800)275-8326 for a free case evaluation of your accident, no obligation. The Reinecke Law Firm has helped thousands of motorcyclists recover from their injuries and accidents for the past 30 years. We have seen it all and know how to help you with your case. We Ride, We Fight, We Win.

 

Famous Celebrities that have been in Motorcycle Accidents

Motorcycles have been around for quite some time and they are thrilling, exciting, and emotional to ride. The feeling you get when you hold on an object that is more comfortable and powerful than any bicycle or horse and can take you nearly anywhere you want is a dream come true. Several celebrities, not just men, love these amazing machines and some of them own not just one motorcycle but some have several. Just because you are a celebrity or a famous person doesn’t mean that you are safe from riding your motorcycle on the streets. You’d be surprised to see which famous people have been involved in motorcycle accidents in the past. Take a look below for a list of our top celebrities that have been in motorcycle accidents. Continue reading “Famous Celebrities that have been in Motorcycle Accidents”

15 Motorcycle safety tips for new riders

Many people dream of getting a motorcycle and many do make the plunge in the purchase. Some people try to stay on top of the latest and greatest and others just buy what they can afford and look cool, whatever your reason for buying a motorcycle there is a good chance that you should take into consideration when purchasing a motorcycle. Below are 15 safety tips for new or returning riders.

1. Don’t buy a bike out of your range.

motorcycle riderIf you’ve been off of motorcycles for awhile, you may be surprised by the performance of today’s bikes including models with small-displacement engines. They can be notably faster and more powerful than they were 10 or 20 years ago. For a beginner a bike with 150cc-300cc will be perfect for learning on. If you plan to ride on the highways you’ll need a 500cc to 1000cc to be able to handle the speed.

2. Ride a bike that you’ll fit.

Nothing is worse is riding a bike too big or too small in size. It’ll lead to uncomfortable rides and wishing you spent the extra money for something more your size. Some bikes are made for taller people and others for shorter people. Make sure you can handle the weight and size of the bike as well as being comfortable on it.

3. Invest in antilock brakes. 

Now standard on a wide range of models, antilock brakes are a proven lifesaver. IIHS data shows that motorcycles equipped with ABS brakes were 37% less likely to be involved in a fatal crash than bikes without it. “No matter what kind of rider you are, ABS can brake better than you,” says Bruce Biondo of the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles Motorcycle Safety Program. The reason is simple: Locking up the brakes in a panic stop robs the rider of any steering control. That can easily lead to a skid and crash, which can result in serious injury. ABS helps you retain steering control during an emergency stop, and it can be especially valuable in slippery conditions. Upgrading to antilock brakes are not as expensive as you think and you will be glad of the difference they’ll make.

4. Hone your skills.

An MSF course or similar class can teach you the basics, as well as advanced techniques, such as how to perform evasive emergency maneuvers. The cost ranges from free to about $350. An approved safety course may make you eligible for an insurance discount and, in some states, to skip the road-test and/or the written test part of the licensing process. Some motorcycle manufacturers offer a credit toward the cost of a new motorcycle or training if a rider signs up for an MSF course. The MSF website lists about 2,700 locations for such courses around the United States.

5. Use your head.

For some helmets are a hard thing to talk about but the facts show the risk. Riders without a helmet are 40% more likely to suffer a fatal head injury in a crash and are 3x’s more likely to suffer brain injuries, than those with helmets, according to government studies.

“It is absolute insanity to repeal helmet laws,” says Orly Avitzur, M.D., a neurologist and a Consumer Reports medical adviser. “Because helmets do save lives, it is insanity to expose the skull and the brain to potential trauma that could be prevented or at least mitigated.”

A full-face helmet that’s approved by the Department of Transportation is the best choice. (Look for a DOT certification sticker on the helmet.) Modern helmets are strong, light weight, and comfortable, and they cut down on wind noise and fatigue. Keep in mind that helmets deteriorate over time, and may not be safe even if they look fine.

6. Wear the right gear. 

motorcycle gearJeans, T-shirt, and sandals are recipes for a painful disaster on a bike. Instead, you want gear that will protect you from wind chill, flying bugs and debris, and, yes, lots of road rash if you should slide out. For maximum protection, go for a leather or other reinforced jacket, gloves, full pants, and over-the-ankle footwear, even in summer. Specially designed jackets with rugged padding and breathable mesh material provide protection as well as ventilation for riding in warm weather. You’ll also want effective eye protection; don’t rely on eyeglasses or a bike’s windscreen. Use a helmet visor or goggles. And keep in mind that car drivers who have hit a motorcycle rider often say they just didn’t see them, so choose gear in bright colors.

7. Be defensive.

A study by the University of South Florida’s Center for Urban Transportation Research found that in collisions involving a motorcycle and a car, car drivers were at fault 60% of the time. So, you need to be extra alert, especially in this age of epidemic phone use and texting behind the wheel. Keep your eyes open for cars suddenly changing lanes or pulling out from side streets. Always keep a safe following distance, both to stopping and reacting to obstacles in the road. An object that a car might easily straddle could be a serious hazard when on a bike.

8. Avoid bad weather. 

riding in the rainRain and snow can cause slippery pavements and surfaces. It can also make it hard to see while riding and cause you crash. Braking and turning are limited when you make decisions to ride in bad weather. Avoid trying to make sudden maneuvers and movements when the ground is wet. If you have to ride in the rain be sure that you wait an hour or two for the oils of the road to be washed off as they can make surfaces even more slippery. Wind gusts can also make for a difficult ride. Always give yourself enough room when wind is a factor as it can push you and your bike back and forth in the lane.

9. Watch for road hazards. 

A motorcycle has less contact with the pavement than a car. Sand, leaves, or pebbles can cause a bike to slide unexpectedly, easily resulting in a laid down bike. Bumps and potholes that you might barely notice in a car can pose serious danger when on a bike. If you can’t avoid them, slow down as much as possible before encountering them, with minimal steering input. Railroad tracks and other hazards should be approached as close to a right angle as possible, to reduce the chances of a skid.

10. Be ready to roll.

Before each ride, do an inspection to make sure your lights, horn, and signals are working properly. Check the chain, belt, or shaft and the brakes. Inspect the tires for wear and make sure they’re set at the proper inflation. Motorcycle mechanics we’ve spoken with say they routinely see worn-out brakes and improperly inflated tires that greatly increase safety risks. When tires are under-inflated, handling and steering gets hard, and the bike doesn’t want to lean. A simple inspection of your bike can take less than 5 minutes and can make all the difference in the world and prevent an accident.

11. Keep your Bike Maintained.

Maintain your bike as to be ready to ride on a last minute decision. If you have to think about something that needs to be fixed take your motorcycle into the shop or if you know how to fix it do it yourself. Be sure to have your oil changed at the right times to make sure your engine will continue to run as well as not letting your bike sit for too long as it can create clogs in the carburetor. Make sure your brakes have a good amount of meat left on them to help you stop best.

12. Be Smart. 

When riding be sure that you ride in a manner where you are not endangering yourself and others around you. Obey the laws of the roads and always obey the posted speed limit. If dangers arise pull over to the side or slow down enough to avoid them. Never attempt stunt riding as it is illegal on highways and roads. If riding in a pack or group be sure to know the signals of the other riders to avoid confusion when obstacles arise.

13. Give Respect.

respectMany motorcyclists, especially in California, will give you two fingers out. This doesn’t mean a hate sign but it means that you are seen and given respect for being another rider out on the street. Not everyone will give you the sign but a good majority will and you will feel like a true biker when you do.

14. Get good insurance. 

When riding and racing around on the streets it is a very good idea to have good insurance coverage as it will help in case an accident comes your way. Having good coverage means that you have both liability and uninsured/underinsured motorists coverage. Some people drive without insurance and it can be costly to you to get everything fixed including yourself if you have to go to the doctors and have many procedures done. Always have a copy of your insurance policy with you at all times so that you can present it in case of an accident.

15. Prepare for the worst.

Having good insurance, good riding apparel, a properly maintained motorcycle, and the best weather conditions can not always prepare you for an accident. Accidents happen quite often for beginners but it is not always the riders fault for the accident. Hiring a good lawyer can mean the difference of getting pennies to getting thousands or even, in some cases, millions of dollars for your accident. The Reinecke Law Firm is a great choice for handling all kinds of motorcycle cases. Over 30 years of experience in motorcycle accidents. Our attorney will fight to get what you deserve and has been very successful in fulfilling that promise. Over 98.7% success rate!

If you or a loved one have been in a motorcycle accident call The Reinecke Law Firm at 1(800)275-8326 for a free case evaluation. We will tell you what to expect from your case right over the phone. Call today!

 

Motorcycle Recalls, Is your Motorcycle on the List?

Yamaha, Honda, and Suzuki have had quite a bit of recalls on some of their motorcycles. If you do own one of the models please take it in to the dealership to have it fixed immediately. If you are in an accident caused by one of these recalls please contact The Reinecke Law Firm immediately. Your safety and well being is our biggest concern when you are involved in a motorcycle accident. Continue reading “Motorcycle Recalls, Is your Motorcycle on the List?”