Recent motorcycle accident news Socal March 11th

 

March 6th, 2017

A 49-year-old man from Sylmar who died in a motorcycle crash on Saturday was identified by authorities on Monday.

Stefan Habelmann died from his injuries hours after a 2:10 p.m. Saturday crash in the area of Reseda Boulevard and Oxnard Street in Tarzana that also seriously injured a female motorcycle passenger, authorities said on Monday.

A Simi Valley woman driving a 2016 Dodge Charger was in the process of negotiating a U-turn from eastbound Oxnard to westbound Oxnard when the crash occurred east of the intersection, according to Officer Sal Reyes with LAPD’s Valley Traffic Division.

Habelmann was traveling eastbound on Oxnard Street when his 2011 Suzuki motorcycle collided with the driver’s side door of the Charger.

The motorcyclist’s passenger, a 49-year-old Tarzana woman, was ejected from the motorcycle.

Habelmann and the woman were taken to a local hospital where he died a few hours later.

The female motorcycle passenger was listed in serious but stable condition.

The driver of the Charger, who remained at scene, suffered minor injuries and was not taken to the hospital, officials said.


March 6th 2017

Lake Forest

A 17-year-old year old Lake Forest boy died Monday afternoon after the motorcycle he was riding hit a pole.

Tynan Blackledge was riding northbound on Jeronimo Road, north of El Toro Road, when he lost control of the bike, Orange County sheriff’s Lt. Kevin La Pyrne said.

Deputies and paramedics were called at about 12:15 p.m. to the crash and found the boy. Blackledge, identified by the coroner’s office, was pronounced dead at the scene.

La Pyrne said deputies were still investigating what led to the crash.

A family friend has set up a GoFundMe account to help Tynan’s family pay for funeral expenses. It had raised more than $7,200 in 9 hours.

http://www.ocregister.com/articl…/forest-745904-boy-old.html


March 4th 2017

San Marcos, CA (near Escondido)

A 19-year-old man who was seriously injured late Saturday night after losing control of his motorcycle in San Marcos later died, sheriff’s officials said.

The teen was on his motorcycle heading west on Borden Road near Fulton Road around 11:51 p.m. when he lost control and collided with several objects, said sheriff’s Deputy Jameson Perham.

When deputies and a San Marcos fire department crew arrived, the rider was found lying on the sidewalk, unresponsive. He suffered serious injuries and was taken to Palomar Medical Center.

The rider, whose name was not released, died on Monday, according to Perham.

Story Here


March 6th 2017

Lemon Grove, CA (near La Mesa – SD County)

A motorcyclist who rear-ended a car on a Lemon Grove roadway, then crashed into a nearby parked vehicle was ejected from the bike and later died in a hospital, authorities said Monday.

Witnesses told sheriff’s deputies that a 1992 Harley-Davidson motorcycle had struck the back of a 2010 Toyota Corolla while both were headed north on Massachusetts Avenue near San Miguel Avenue shortly before 7:30 p.m. Sunday. The impact of the crash sent the motorcycle into a vehicle parked on the roadside, according to sheriff’s Sgt. Jorge Dueno.

The motorcyclist was ejected in the crash and suffered serious injuries. He was taken to a hospital where he later died, Dueno said. His name was withheld pending family notification.

The Toyota’s driver and passenger were not hurt.

Dueno said the sheriff’s department had launched an investigation into the crash, and although its cause has yet to be determined, alcohol and/or drugs seemed to have been a factor. However, he did not immediately say on which motorist’s part.

No arrests have been made in connection with the crash, Dueno said.

Anyone with additional information was asked to call the sheriff’s department at (858) 565-5200.

Story Here


We are saddened by these tragic stories of fatal motorcycle accidents. We send our prayers and condolences to the families and friends of those that lost their loved ones. We encourage all riders to ride safe and do their best to avoid these tragic situations.

As a true motorcycle lawyer we fight for riders! If you or a loved one was injured or killed in a motorcycle accident contact The Reinecke Law Firm today for a free case evaluation at 1 (800) 275-8326. You may be entitled to compensation.

What Type of Motorcyclist Are You?

There exists many types of motorcycles on and off the roads. A lot of times you can tell what kind of motorcyclist you are depending on the type of motorcycle that you ride. Dirt motorcyclists are classified as typically a track rider or cross country rider. Road motorcyclists have a lot more, there are cruisers, track riders, stunters, squids, mechanics, travelers, and philosophers. Since we deal road motorcyclists we are going to focus our attention on these types of street riders.

1. Cruisers

Cruisers are your normal leather wearing jacket riders who are tough and never seem to ride with a full face helmet. They enjoy group rides and keeping their motorcycles in pristine condition. They are charitable and love to help in the community. They stand for right but don’t ever cut them off. They love their Harleys more than their own wives. They are like cowboys but more comfortable and enjoy traveling to motorcycle rallies.

2. Road Travelers

They can be compared to cruiser riders but are more on the road exploring cities and the country than they are at home. They are found out on the roads during the summer time and the weekends and normally found with a partner riding behind them. They tend to be older and love Goldwings or the HD Glider Motorcycles. They are always ready for camping next to the road if they need to. These riders tend to ride with plastic or rubber clothes because they don’t care about the amount of water that rains on them.

3. Adventurists

These riders ride the enduro motorcycles that aren’t great for either on or off the roads. They are the motorcycles that are semi-big and bulky and stand really high off the ground to have rock clearance. These riders will typically ride out in the mountain sides and hit the off-road trails to explore the wilderness and be in the true outdoors. They normally ride with off-road helmets and padded jackets.

4. Stunters

These riders always have the most modified motorcycles with cages, a tank used as a seat, foot pegs in twelve different places, a hole in their rear seat, and always have at least one wheel in the air. They are normally in good bouncing shape as they love to jump from one sitting position to standing or laying down position. They wear hooded sweatshirts and tight pants, and a helmet with the visor open. Also found in big or small parking lots doing lots and lots of circles.

5. Squids

These guys are brand new to motorcycling and are trying to fit in on a budget. They wear short sleeves and shorts when riding, will have a motor burn somewhere on their legs and will wear vans or flips when riding. Everyone hopes they will eventually spend some money for proper riding equipment and most likely to be involved in a road rash accident. Never sell a new motorcycle to these newbies.

6. Mechanics

Often found in the garage or at the parts store. They know every aspect of the motorcycle and will do all they can to get every inch of horsepower out of their iron steed. They love to learn how things work and are willing to take their motorcycle apart and tweak even the finest of details to make it run without a flaw. They never feel they need a certificate to say the are a mechanic, they just get to work. You may have to wait until the weekends to see them because the spend all their other time working on their motorcycles.

7. Philosophers

These riders love to ride older motorcycles with a more simple design. Cafe Racer style with low handle bars and sporty wheels, normally a Triump brand. These guys love to just ride and fly down the roads. They like the in-between look of a cruiser and a sportbike but want a lighter feel with very limited components. The more simple the motorcycle the happier they are. They typically can be compared to a greaser that could be found in the old TV show “Happy Days”.

8. Commuters

These riders only ride to get from home to work or wherever they need to be quickly and efficiently. They are the ones that ride upright motorcycles made for good posture and can be very economical. They all ride with quiet mufflers because they don’t have a sense of hatred and they are very safe and cautious about their riding. They will always be respectful and just want to keep a smile on their face.

Let us know what type of rider you are and if you enjoyed this simple read. Whatever and wherever you decide to ride be sure to stay safe and ride smart.

If you are ever in a motorcycle accident contact The Reinecke Law Firm at (800)275-8326 for a free consultation. You may be eligible for compensation of your injuries and damaged properties. The Reinecke Law Firm has helped thousands of motorcyclists with their accidents and knows how to help you with yours! Call us today!

New Motorcycles Coming for Next Year

ducati-xdiavel

In Milan, Italy the EICMA 74th Worldwide Motorcycle Exhibition 2016 many top companies are exposing their new motorcycles coming to life with the desire of gaining new and old customers to purchase the latest and greatest motorcycles to come in 2017.

ducati-xdiavel

A few corporations such as Honda, Ducati, and Yamaha have already revealed new models  and features of motorcycles that will be ready for purchase within this next year. Eicma-Motorcycle Exhibition is a 4 day event being held from 10th November to the 13th to show case the many advancements and industry in the motorcycle communities around the world.

kawasaki-ninja-zx-10r-2016-eicma-2015

Motorcyclists of all kinds will flock from all over the world to get the first peaks of new products available. All types of riders including those who ride trails, roads, races, cross-country and many other types of motorcycles will be ready to see the future motorcycling. Did we mention there will be models showing off most of these magnificent machines?

Not only will there be tons of new motorcycles being revealed but also new safety equipment; helmets, goggles, armor, shoes, and more. This exhibition is not just for motorcycles and equipment, it is also home to almost all two-wheeled vehicles both powered by gas and electricity. Bicycle shops will be aplenty showing off their own technologies as well.

For more information about the event Click Here.

If you are ever in a motorcycle accident contact The Reinecke Law Firm for a free case evaluation toll free at (800)275-8326. The Reinecke Law Firm has helped thousands of motorcyclists recover from their accidents for the past 30 years. Call now for free advice about your motorcycle accident.

Left-turn motorcycle accidents

left turn crash

Who is at Fault in a Left Turn Motorcycle Crash

Many motorcyclists believe after being involved in a left turn motorcycle accident that they are protected by the California Vehicle Code § 21801, which states that the driver of a vehicle will yield the right of way, until the turn can be made with a reasonable difference. The motorcyclist in a left turn collision may believe that they do not need to be represented by a lawyer, since it appears like it is clear who is at fault. But avoiding motorcycle injuries is not always possible, and neither is determining fault by reading the CVC.

There are several problems with this, the first is even if there is a traffic collision report, stating that the driver of the car was at fault. In the state of California the traffic collision report is considered hearsay. This can mean that the insurance company does not have to consider this as proof of fault.

The insurance company attorneys not having to consider the traffic accident report, will then begin placing partial blame or complete blame on the innocent victim. They have several things that they might claim, like being inattentive or riding at an unsafe speed at the time of the collision or they might claim that even though, you the motorcycle rider had the right of way, you should have yielded to the car.

The insurance lawyers can attempt to claim that the motorcyclist was not wearing bright enough clothing or anything else that could make the motorcyclist at fault instead of their insured driver involved in the car accident. So besides being worried about getting your bike fixed and getting paid for custom motorcycle parts, now you need to worry about how your going to PROVE it was not your fault.

motorcycle close up-01-01Negligence is the way we determine who is at fault and their degree of fault.  Both a rider and motorists can be partially responsible and the biker can still recover money. Some of these accidents take place due the motorcycle operator passing a larger vehicle in the same travel lane, that may have obscured him from an oncoming vehicle that decides to turn left. The other motorist typically is not prepared for this type of maneuver and will not have enough reaction time to complete the left turn safely.  This makes the car into a wall of steel that the rider crashes into, ejecting the rider from their bike.

The blame for accidents of this nature is not the sole burden of vehicle owners, but also on reckless motorcycle riders. Starting a motorcycle lawsuit is not always the answer. A key factor to note is that most insurance companies do not want to pay money for compensation after a rider smack down.  Their attorneys will do what they can to backup the despicable insurance company, to reduce the liability of their insured driver. This will mean that they can pay less to the innocent or injured victim. It becomes a windfall to the large corporation who treats the rider like a stooge.

When a motorcycle and vehicle collide at a high rate of speed, the insurance company will try to place complete or at least partial fault on the motorcyclist. They will say it is really a matter of improving rider safety, by the cyclist being more attentive, etc. This is why the rider needs the experienced motorcycle accident lawyer to fight for their rights, to prove liability after a driver has caused a collision.

Statistics

Left-hand turn accidents make up approximately 42% of all reported collisions on the road today according to the statistics with all types of vehicles.

Typical Motorcycle scenarios include:

  • A rider is passing a vehicle that had blocked him from view
  • A rider driving towards an intersection
  • A rider overtaking the biker and cuts left in from on him, sideswiping the rider, etc.

Let’s face it, many motorists simply don’t see the bike until it is too late. Situational awareness on the open road, is a key factor in avoidance of vehicle accidents. Many drivers traversing down the highway are inattentive. This behavior makes the offending motorists liable for the rider’s torment and costs.

Mitigating Damages

Accidents normally come from out of the blue, and are totally unpredictable.  Only sturdy boots, helmets and other gear, coupled with training and muscle memory can diminish the overall harm arising from the initial calamity. The bottom line is that even batman driving head on into the side of car making an illegal turn, is gonna get hurt.

But there are some other things a rider can also endeavor to do, in order to prevent, lessen or abate the heinous outcome.

motorcycle crash

How to Correctly make a Left-Hand Turn

At the outset, a car operator needs to not be a jerk and pay attention. This elementary action will actually save lives and on trips to the courthouse. Below is a checklist for all road users.  This should help riders and other motorists understand the rules of the road and exercise some basic civility.

  • Always utilize your turn signal when approaching the turn. Slow the vehicle down and give yourself time to scan the road at least 70 or so feet in front of yourself.
  • Don’t jump lanes.  Assure that you are actually in the correct lane and don’t make unsafe, last minute lane changes when approaching the turn.
  • Exercise extreme care when at the intersection. Stay idle until safe to move. You must have optimum situational awareness before turning.
  • The law requires that you give the right of way to pedestrians and oncoming traffic.
  • Negotiate the turn by staying right of the center line divider, and don’t jump lanes. Stay in your same predesignated lane. This means stay in the inner lane. The outside lane is designated for motorists who are negotiating right hand turns.
  • Always look left and right and in both rear view mirrors immediately prior to making the maneuver.
  • Do not speed, especially at a four way intersection.  You may not have enough time to slow and avoid a head on hazard as you head towards the lights.

If you or a loved one are ever in a motorcycle accident contact The Reinecke Law Firm at (800)275-8326 for a free case evaluation. The Reinecke Law Firm has helped thousands of motorcyclists recover from their accidents for the past 30 years and we know exactly how to help you. Do not hesitate to call today.

AB-51 Lane Splitting Bill, We are in Support

June 15, 2016

The Lane-splitting Bill AB-51 is to protect riders. The bill being passed will be to help further educate motorcyclists and motorists of the correct ways to safely lane-split. The law will not add rules or guidelines to lane splitting like it has tried before but it will be to create educational guidelines set by the California Highway Patrol.

Below is the video footage of the Bill being supported by a numerous amount of people clarifying their reasoning to have the bill. Continue reading “AB-51 Lane Splitting Bill, We are in Support”

Anti-lock braking system are a no brainer for Motorcycles

According to recent studies motorcycles that are equipped with Anit-lock Braking Systems or ABS brakes are less likely to be involved in a motorcycle crash. Most motorcycles in the United States are not sold with ABS brakes and are not required. They are typically sold as an upgrade but are highly recommended as most brakes will lock up the wheel causing you to skid and crash in the event of a quick stop.

abs

How do ABS brakes work?

An anti-lock braking system works by constantly measuring wheel speed. One common way to do this is with a small grooved ring near the brake disc often called a tone wheel. The wheel speed sensor sends the tone wheel readings to the ABS unit, which can determine whether the wheel is about to stop rotating. If it is, wheel speed information is used to adjust the pressure from the brake cylinder on the brake caliper multiple times per second.

Take a look at this video for a demonstration of what ABS brakes do when trying to stop on a wet surface.

From the video it is quite amazing the difference of traction and control you have when you do have an anti-lock braking system installed on your motorcycle. It truly is a night and day scenario.

Is it worth the cost?

Absolutely, we think it is worth the cost. If you are going to be riding on the streets and for long distances or even in any type of weather we highly suggest getting an anti-lock braking system with your motorcycle. It will help you stop when motorist make lane changes in front of you or in many emergency stopping situations. Experience is a must for every motorcycle rider but it won’t help you when in the case of a sudden stop on a wet surface.

There are several questions or opinionated statements about ABS systems that are just plain myths, take a look below for some of these myths:

Myth: ABS may allow you to stop with more control, but it will take you longer to come to a stop.

This myth is generally based on the assumption that a locked-up wheel provides the most traction possible. This isn’t true. A skidding tire has less traction than a tire that is not skidding.

Here’s how ABS works. Speed sensors measure the rotational speed of each wheel. If a wheel risks locking due to intense braking or slick conditions, the ABS unit modulates hydraulic pressure in the braking system. Not only does the system maintain the “sweet spot” of maximum stopping force that occurs before lockup, but by avoiding lock-up, the inertial effect of the spinning wheel is maintained, stabilizing the motorcycle.

By keeping the wheels from locking up and skidding when you grab the brakes, ABS not only allows you to maintain some control, but it allows you to stop in a shorter distance.

Myth: ABS modulates system pressure whenever you apply the brakes.

A lot of the rider bias against ABS is that the system is always active, modulating your brakes in all stopping instances and thereby affecting the riding experience. On the contrary, ABS only kicks in to prevent wheel lockup, such as during panic-stop situations or when you encounter black ice.

At other times, such as during typical controlled stops or slowing for corners, ABS does not affect how the brakes work.


Myth: All ABS systems work the same, making my sportbike stop like a big touring motorcycle.

Like any other computer-controlled function of your motorcycle—fuel injection, ignition curves, even valve timing on some bikes—ABS can be customized for a specific application.

In fact, today some ABS-equipped motorcycles offer different settings for different riding preferences or conditions. For example, a “rain” setting may activate the ABS sooner while a “track” setting may reduce the system’s modulating effects.

Myth: ABS is just another link in the system that can fail, and when it does I will have no brakes.

Not true. If the ABS unit fails, the braking system reverts to its traditional braking function.

Myth: ABS is dangerous off pavement.

It depends. In severe off-road situations, ABS does not always work very well. However, in most non-pavement environments, ABS-equipped motorcycles allow you to perform a panic stop or stop on slick surfaces with more control than non-ABS-equipped motorcycles.

An example of this type of scenario would be a sudden stop on a gravel road when a deer darts into your path. In this scenario, you would be able to use both brakes fully and come to a stop with more control on an ABS-equipped motorcycle than a motorcycle without ABS.

However, in true off-road situations, such as deep sand or very rough terrain, ABS may cause unwanted pressure modulations in the brake system.

These types of conditions are rampant in off-road situations, such as single-track trail. This is why it’s critical that ABS is optional equipment for dual-sport motorcycles and, when ABS is installed, an override switch is available so the rider can turn the system off when the bike is going to be ridden in true off-road environments.

Also, don’t forget that ABS is not always working: Unless you are in a wheel lockup situation, the ABS will not modulate the pressure in the braking system.


Myth: ABS can overcome a lack of riding skill.

Absolutely not. Neither ABS nor any other type of motorcycle technology can replace experience and proper training. For example, a rider who has not learned how to properly use the front brake will not stop effectively and safelty using just the rear brake, whether the motorcycle is equipped with ABS or not.

Myth: ABS only works with the rear wheel.

This is a strange one, but it’s nevertheless an assumption that we’ve come across in anti-ABS discussions with riders. ABS works with both the front and rear wheels to prevent lock-up. In fact, for most riders who brake most heavily with the front brake in wheel-lockup situations, the technology is probably more effective with the front brake.

Myth/Fact: ABS requires you to re-learn how to brake.

ABS does not affect typical braking function and, therefore, won’t affect how you brake your motorcycle in these situations. However, experienced riders admit that the presence of ABS may change their technique in some scenarios.

If you accept that ABS will modulate the brakes more effectively in a panic-stop scenario, experienced riders say they would be best served by simply braking hard and focusing on keeping the motorcycle upright.

That said, these same riders caution that more research, testing and curriculum development is necessary to make any definitive statements about exactly how ABS should impact hard-braking technique.

Myth/Fact: ABS is difficult to maintain.

This depends on the motorcycle—and the motorcycle owner. Certainly, some owners can service their ABS-equipped motorcycles just fine.

Others prefer to take their bike to the dealer. Consult your manual, honestly assess your own abilities and proceed with caution.

The good news, though, is that all modern braking systems—those with ABS and without—have relatively lenient maintenance schedules. Again, consult your manual.

 


Myth/Fact: ABS-equipped bikes are not safer. It’s just that riders who can afford and buy motorcycles that have ABS are more experienced and safer riders.

Without a doubt, correlation does not necessarily mean causation. Raw data that show bikes with ABS are involved in fewer crashes than bikes without ABS cannot be taken at face value as proof that ABS makes motorcycles safer.

That said, anecdotal experience suggests that the technology has significant safety benefits. After all, when interviewed about their experience with ABS in panic-stop and low-traction scenarios, longtime riders with a variety of backgrounds insist that the technology works (see “Testing Grounds: Experiencing ABS,” page 49).

What can’t be overlooked, however, is that while ABS has its benefits, there is one big caveat: safety will always begin with the rider. In other words, a skilled rider on a non-ABS-equipped bike will always be safer than an unskilled rider on an ABS-equipped bike.

After all, the key to not crashing is to avoid situations that make you likely to crash in the first place. This is where riding training and experience come into play. Ultimately, consumers will determine whether ABS becomes the defacto standard, but in the meantime, riders already have a healthy spectrum of choices available to them in the marketplace.

If you are debating whether or not to purchasing a motorcycle with or without ABS we hope that we have convinced you. ABS systems can make the difference between life and death, as serious as that sounds it can be true. Statistics show that motorcycles with ABS systems have shorter stopping distances, fewer crashes and deaths, can have savings on motorcycle insurance, and more. Save yourself and your money from crashes by having ABS on your motorcycle.

Overall, if you or a loved one are involved in a motorcycle accident please seek medical attention first and then call The Reinecke Law Firm for a free consultation at (800)275-8326. You may be entitled to compensation for your injuries, loss of income, property damage and more. The Reinecke Law Firm has helped thousands of motorcyclists for the past 30 years recover from their accidents and know how to help you with your case. Don’t hesitate to call, we will give you free advice right over the phone.

Norman Reedus Give Novice Riders Some Tips

On “The Walking Dead,” Norman Reedus’s character, Daryl Dixon, is often seen riding a motorcycle in the zombie apocalypse, a skill the actor honed for decades. Reedus is so into motorcycles that AMC gave him his own unscripted series, “Ride With Norman Reedus.”

But it’s far from a “Sons of Anarchy” meets Daryl Dixon examination of Harleys and bad boys. In the show, Reedus takes rides through various parts of the country, exploring different facets of the motorcycle culture. In the premiere episode alone, he cruises up the Pacific Coast Highway, from Los Angeles to Santa Cruz, stopping at a factory that makes electric motorcycles, and tapes a podcast with the people behind “Motorcycles & Misfits.”

Reedus says the show is for novices and experts alike. “[The goal] is to have people feel like they’re on that ride with us,” he says. “We didn’t want to be a gearhead show in anyway.”

Below, Reedus shares his tips for those newbies curious about how to start riding.

Talk to people, the old-fashioned way

Reedus says the best place to start with motorcyles is to seek out a friend who rides. “Talk to them about it,” he says. “Have them show you things. Sometimes it seems like a daunting thing to learn. But it’s kind of a natural progression from bicycle to a Vespa to a motorcycle. You just have to learn gears and certain things that involve a motor.”

Don’t go big

Reedus understands that getting on a motorcycle for the first few times can induce some anxiety. Therefore, he suggests sticking to something more manageable — and there’s no shame in it.

“You can start small,” he says. “Little motorcycles are just as fun. You just have to get over that hurdle. I can see how it can be pretty intimidating. Sometimes I get on bikes and I get intimidated.”

Norman Reedus riding with Imogen, Liza, and the Re-Cycle Garage crew, California, February 2-4, 2016
Norman Reedus riding with Imogen, Liza, and the Re-Cycle Garage crew, California, February 2-4, 2016 PHOTO:MARK SCHAFER/AMC

Surroundings matter

Beginners should focus on their immediate surroundings, Reedus says. Having access to much more in your line of sight makes the experience much different than driving a car. “You don’t have the restrictions of being in a car and seeing just what’s out the windshield and having blind spots,” he says. “You really don’t have blind spots on a motorcycle.”

That said, being hyperaware of cars around you is key. “You just have to be very aware of what’s going on around you,” he says. “Nowadays you have to assume everyone around you is texting and driving, since everyone does it.”

Get in your head

Reedus uses his time on a bike to work through the things in his day-to-day life. And it can become a zen-like process. “I do some of my best thinking with the helmet on,” he says. “That’s how I go to work every day. I think about my lines on the way to work, I decompress on the way home, I come up with ideas like that all the time. Although you’re connected to what’s around you, you’re also very isolated. The conversation is with yourself, in your head.”

Think outside the box for those first rides

“Away from traffic is the best place to ride bikes,” he says. “I discovered so many great trails and great routes throughout the U.S. based on what people told me; it was all word of mouth. Those were all my favorite rides, when you get off the beaten path. Go to the emptiest, most scenic routes. I say, take the slow route.”

Source: Wall Street Journal

Check out some of our riding tips found in our previous blogs. Our tips are truly to help save you from having a motorcycle accident or crash. If you or a loved one are involved in a motorcycle crash contact The Reinecke Law Firm at (800)275-8326 for a free case evaluation. We have helped thousands of motorcyclists with their cases over the past 30 years and have the knowledge to help you with your motorcycle crash. Do not hesitate to call, we are available 24/7.

Top Southern California Biker Bars

After a long day of working or motorcycling it’s always refreshing to refuel the most important tank, your stomach. But the big question is where to go? In this posting we will take a look at some of the most popular places to fuel up with some tasty grub. Some of these places can be found in small cities to just on the out skirts of town. Possibly on the end of the perfect riding road. Wherever you ride just keep in mind of these awesome biker bars for some great company, grub, and drinks. ***Always drink responsibly.***

Los Angeles

Big Oaks Lodge - Los Angeles Biker Bars - LA Motorcycle BarsBig Oaks Lodge
33101 Bouquet Cyn Rd.
Saugus, California
661-296-5656
Nice ride in the canyon, Good BBQ on Sat-Sun 11am-5pm. Great Steak dinners starting at 5pm. Great burgers.  On weekends, this joint is filled with bikers.  Most Sundays, you’ll find an impressive array of motorcycles in the front of the Lodge and filling the adjacent parking lot.

Orange County

cooks corner2Cook’s Corner
19122 Live Oak Canyon Rd,
Trabuco Canyon, California 92679-3004
(949)858-0266
Legendary biker bar housed in an old military barracks. Hundreds of motorcycles in the parking lot on weekends – choppers, cruisers, sport bikes, you name it. Good food, live music, and a great outdoor party scene. You can’t ride in the OC without checking out this place. www.cookscorners.com

 height=Tumbleweeds
21094 S. Beach Blvd.
Huntington Beach, California
(714) 960-2776
www.tumbleweedshb.com
Biker friendly and a fun crowd. Great food and STRONG, cheap drinks. Locals affectionately refer to this bar as “Stumbleweeds.” Live bands, big dance floor, pool tables and games, and lots of TVs for sports fans. If you’re hanging out in Huntington Beach, check it out.
Orange County Motorcycle Bar - Original Mike'sOriginal Mike’s
100 South Main Street, Santa Ana, CA 92701
714-550-7764
Fun bar and restaurant in downtown Santa Ana. Owned by the legendary biker, “Big” Mike Harrah, who is a cross between Donald Trump and Billy Gibbons from ZZ Top. Lots of bike nights, classic car nights, karaoke nights, live music, and other events. Decent grub and drink specials.

Riverside

hells kitchenHells Kitchen Motorsports Restaurant
32685 Ortega Hwy,
Lake Elsinore, California
(951) 609-3390 www.hellskitchen-ca.com
Motorsports themed restaurant located near the top of Ortega Highway 74.  Great food with a flame painted coffin that opens automatically for your food condiments. Paved parking for 100’s of motorcycles only – cars park in the dirt lot! Pool tables, free popcorn, Starbucks coffee, lots of beers on tap.  Outside vendors selling biker stuff on weekends.  Owners are riders.

LR_Toms_FarmsTom’s Farms 
23900 Temescal Canyon Rd
Corona,  CA  92883
(951) 277-4422 www.tomsfarms.com
Interstate 15 to the Temescal off ramp. Paved parking for 100’s of motorcycles on weekends. All kinds of different food, beer, wine, a full deli and store. Lots of shopping, furniture, crafts, etc.  Live music around the small lake.  Cool hang out.

Lookout-Roadhouse-12-640x426The Lookout Roadhouse
32107 Ortega Highway
Lake Elsinore, CA 92530-6568
(951) 678-9010
Awesome view overlooking Lake Elsinore but the parking lot is dirt, so don’t wash your bike if you’re going to the Lookout.  Food & beer.

harolds saloon riversideHarold’s Saloon
3834 Megginson Ln,
Riverside, California
(909) 359-5261
91 freeway, exit Tyler Ave. to Magnolia, right turn. behind Firestone tires on corner of Magnolia & Hole ave. across from Galleria at Tyler. Extremely Biker Friendly, Great atmosphere, cute barmaids, COLD beer.

maxresdefaultLake Alice Trading Co.
3616 University Avenue
Riverside, California
(909) 686-7343
Biker friendly, Fri. & Sat. night live music

beer-garden-1Temecula Wine & Beer Garden
28464 Old Town Front Street,
Temecula, California
(909) 506-4474
Nice outdoor atmosphere, live bands, parking in the rear or on the street right out front. Very biker friendly, live music, plenty of parking and bikes always in view.

San Diego

hideoutThe Hideout Saloon & Steakhouse
27413 Highway 76
Santa Ysabel, California
760-782-3656
Lake Henshaw Area, back county northeast San Diego County. 1.5 miles west of Hwy 79 on Hwy 76.  Great food with a great ride, awesome entertainment; hundred’s of motorcycles on weekends. Paved parking. Owners are riders.

Molly'sWay Point Saloon
 
1270 Main Street
Ramona, California
(760) 789-9050
Dart and pool tourneys, parties all the time for any occasion.  Harley & sport bike friendly bar.  Great people. Awesome food.  www.mollymalones.org

the go loungeThe Go Lounge 

7123 El Cajon Blvd,
San Diego, California
(619) 460-6895
Biker owned bar. Cold beer, wine, pool, darts.  Nice patio out back. Bike parking in front, in view of window.

motorcycle cafeThe Motorcycle Cafe
624 S. Coast Hwy 101,
Oceanside, California
(760) 433-1829
As the name implies – Biker friendly.

Enjoy the bars and drink responsibly. The Reinecke Law Firm is a strong supporter of motorcyclists and has been for the past 30 years. The Reinecke Law Firm has helped thousands of motorcyclists all over California recover from their injuries and damages. If you are involved in a motorcycle accident or crash call The Reinecke Law Firm at (800)275-8326 for a free case evaluation.